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Feasibility of, Adherence to, and Satisfaction With Video Game Versus Traditional Self-Training of the Upper Extremity in People With Chronic Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial / Anat Yacoby [i 4 més]

By: Yacoby, Anat [autor].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: American Occupational Therapy Association Bethesda, Maryland Content type: Text Media type: informàtic Carrier type: recurs en líniaISSN: 02729490.Subject(s): Teràpia Ocupacional | Autonomia funcional | VideojocsOnline resources: Accés restringit usuaris EUIT
Contents:
Gabi Zeilig; Harold Weingarden; Ronit Weiss; Debbie Rand
In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy 2019 GEN-FEB;73(1):7301205080p1-7301205080p14Summary: RESUM: OBJECTIVE. We compared the feasibility of, adherence to, and satisfaction with a newly developed upper extremity (UE) self-training protocol using commercial video games with a traditional self-training program for people with chronic stroke. METHOD. Twenty-four participants with mild to moderate UE weakness were randomized to a video game (n = 13) or traditional (n = 11) self-training program. Participants were requested to train 60 min/day, 6×/wk. During the 5-wk self-training program and 4-wk follow-up, participants documented their self-training time and rated their perceived enjoyment and exertion. RESULTS. Eleven participants completed video game training; 9 completed traditional self-training. During the follow-up period, 8 participants (72.7%) continued the video game training, and 4 (44.4%) continued traditional training. Perceived enjoyment, satisfaction, and benefit for UE improvement were relatively high. CONCLUSIONS. Participants demonstrated high adherence to and satisfaction with both self-training programs. More participants continued to play video games after the intervention, indicating its potential to maintain ongoing activity.
List(s) this item appears in: Novetats bibliogràfiques. Articles. Març 2019
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Biblioteca
Paper Capses ordenades alfabèticament (Browse shelf) Exclòs de préstec Consulta a sala 0001017285725
Journal Journal Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
Biblioteca
Paper Capses ordenades alfabèticament (Browse shelf) Exclòs de préstec També consulta en línia 0000101709086

Mini-Assisting Hand Assessment

Dimensions of Mastery Questionnaire

Functional Inventory

Gabi Zeilig; Harold Weingarden; Ronit Weiss; Debbie Rand

RESUM: OBJECTIVE. We compared the feasibility of, adherence to, and satisfaction with a newly developed upper extremity (UE) self-training protocol using commercial video games with a traditional self-training program for people with chronic stroke.

METHOD. Twenty-four participants with mild to moderate UE weakness were randomized to a video game (n = 13) or traditional (n = 11) self-training program. Participants were requested to train 60 min/day, 6×/wk. During the 5-wk self-training program and 4-wk follow-up, participants documented their self-training time and rated their perceived enjoyment and exertion.

RESULTS. Eleven participants completed video game training; 9 completed traditional self-training. During the follow-up period, 8 participants (72.7%) continued the video game training, and 4 (44.4%) continued traditional training. Perceived enjoyment, satisfaction, and benefit for UE improvement were relatively high.

CONCLUSIONS. Participants demonstrated high adherence to and satisfaction with both self-training programs. More participants continued to play video games after the intervention, indicating its potential to maintain ongoing activity.

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