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A pilot study examining the effectiveness of maintenance Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (MCST) for people with dementia/ Martin Orrell, Aimee Spector, Lene Thorgrimsen and Bob Woods

By: Orrell, Martin.
Contributor(s): Spector, Aimee | Thorgrimsen L | Woods B.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleDescription: 6p, 20 (5) 2005.ISSN: 08856230.Center: is copyrighted. Text may not be copied without the express written permission of the publisher except for the imprint of the video screen content or via the output options of the EBSCOhost software. Text is intended solely for the use of the individual user..Subject(s): Estimulació cognitiva | DemènciaOnline resources: Text complet In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 2005; 20 (5); 446-451Summary: BACKGROUND: A recent randomised controlled trial on Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST) identified the need to evaluate its more long-term benefits for people with dementia. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a weekly maintenance CST programme for people with dementia in residential care. METHOD: Thirty-five people with dementia were included, following on from a seven-week twice-weekly study of CST. The maintenance CST sessions ran in two residential homes using a once a week programme of CST over an additional 16 weeks. Two control homes did not receive the maintenance intervention. RESULTS: Using repeated measures ANOVAS, there was a continuous, significant improvement in cognitive function (MMSE) for those receiving MCST (CST+maintenance CST sessions) as compared to CST alone or no treatment (p = 0.012). There were no effects on quality of life, behaviour or communication following maintenance sessions. The initial cognitive improvements following CST were only sustained at follow-up when followed by the programme of maintenance CST sessions. CONCLUSIONS: The cognitive benefits of CST can be maintained by weekly sessions for around 6 months. A large-scale, multi-centre maintenance CST trial is required to clarify potential longer-term benefits of maintenance CST for dementia.
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Journal article Journal article Escola Universitària d'Infermeria i Teràpia Ocupacional de Terrassa
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Holden Communication Scale (Holden and Woods)

Quality of Life-Alzheimer's Disease Scale (QOL-AD) (Logsdon et al)

Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) (Folstein et al)

Clifton Assessment Procedures for the Elderly-Behaviour Rating Scale (CAPE-BRS) (Pattie and Gilleard)

20070105

BACKGROUND: A recent randomised controlled trial on Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST) identified the need to evaluate its more long-term benefits for people with dementia. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a weekly maintenance CST programme for people with dementia in residential care. METHOD: Thirty-five people with dementia were included, following on from a seven-week twice-weekly study of CST. The maintenance CST sessions ran in two residential homes using a once a week programme of CST over an additional 16 weeks. Two control homes did not receive the maintenance intervention. RESULTS: Using repeated measures ANOVAS, there was a continuous, significant improvement in cognitive function (MMSE) for those receiving MCST (CST+maintenance CST sessions) as compared to CST alone or no treatment (p = 0.012). There were no effects on quality of life, behaviour or communication following maintenance sessions. The initial cognitive improvements following CST were only sustained at follow-up when followed by the programme of maintenance CST sessions. CONCLUSIONS: The cognitive benefits of CST can be maintained by weekly sessions for around 6 months. A large-scale, multi-centre maintenance CST trial is required to clarify potential longer-term benefits of maintenance CST for dementia.

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